What we did in Sydney

Together with my parents, I spent the first week of August in Sydney. It was the first holiday in which I used my smartphone to navigate. Here is a summary of what we did.

Some background: I was born in Sydney, and not coincidentally my parents have a number of friends over there. I’ve been back a couple of times, most recently in 1989 when I attended a Doctor Who convention and we also had a family holiday.

As for this trip, we arrived early in the afternoon of Saturday August 2nd. The main event for our first evening was a classical music program at the Opera House — the first time I’ve ever been inside.

On Sunday we visited the Justice and Police Museum (notable exhibits: maces & other home-made weapons; phrenology model; whips for adult vs juvenile offenders), and then met our friend Ian and his current guide dog at the Botanic Gardens. After lunch, Dad and I visited the Jewish Museum (notable exhibits: talmud; ceremonial objects; art installations; immigration history; maps of ghettos, concentration camps, etc) and one other destination which turned out not to be worth our while, before returning by bus to meet Mum and Ian at the hotel.

On Monday we took the train north to visit friends of my parents, and went for a coastal walk in Bouddi National Park.

View from train Bouddi

Bouddi Bouddi

On Tuesday, a place where we’d planned to have breakfast turned out not to exist anymore, so instead we had breakfast at the place now occupying the same location. Breakfast was followed by a visit to the small but welcoming Kerrie Lowe Ceramics Gallery on our way to the Sydney University museums. (These were smaller than I expected, but the Macleay Museum includes a display on the history of photography, an orang-utan skeleton, and a deformed horse skull connected to a bunyip anecdote; while the Nicholson Museum includes quite a sizeable section on the Etruscans.) After that we visited the Glass Artists’ Gallery (which has some very nice stuff but would benefit from a more spatious venue) and browsed a second-hand bookshop. We spent the evening with more friends of my parents.

On Wednesday we visited the outstanding Australian National Maritime Museum (notable exhibits: whale photographs and artifacts; information on little-known historical alliances; a beer-can boat; a panel on scurvy; some excellent paintings; and a dinosaur on a submarine … that last being a model that belonged to one of the crew), the Chinese Garden of Friendship, and the Sydney Aquarium. In the evening we went to the Capitol Theatre (a lovely venue, btw) to see the Lion King musical (parts of which are amazing).

View from Maritime Museum

Chinese Garden Chinese Garden

On Thursday, we each visited central Sydney museums independently, which in my case meant the Australian Museum (where my favourite exhibits were the crocodiles and the ankylosaur model), the Hyde Park Barracks (which, between the dead rats and the detailed reports on flogging, is a truly delightful place), and the Art Gallery of NSW (from which, here are links to selected works: [****]). In the early afternoon, my parents and I met one of the people I follow on Twitter for coffee.

In the evening I went by myself to the monthly Skeptics in the Pub (going to the wrong address at first, but finding the right one with the help of my Internet and GPS enabled phone) where I enjoyed conversing with Richard Saunders and Jo Alabaster from the Skeptic Zone podcast, as well as other people connected with the Australian Skeptics (including Ian Bryce and Tim Mendham). I gave Richard one of my customised coffee mugs.

On Friday we took the ferry to Nutcote (home of famous author May Gibbs, which I loved) and then took the bus to Taronga Zoo. Animals at Taronga which I don’t think I’ve seen at a zoo before include Komodo dragon and condor. After finishing there, we returned by ferry and got ready for our evening flight home.

Nutcote  Nutcote

Nutcote  Nutcote

Taronga - Komodo Dragon  Taronga - Condors

Taronga - lizard Taronga - lizard 3D

The last two photos above show a lizard of the genus hydrosaurus, the second time in 3D along with a bonus tortoise that I hadn’t noticed at the time. I had previously misidentified this as a tuatara, because it was adjacent to a seemingly unoccupied tuatara enclosure and I really wanted it to be one. (The enclosure shown actually belongs to the tortoise, so I’m not sure what the lizard was doing there.)

I bought several souvineers and gifts while I was in Sydney, mostly from the Maritime Museum and Nutcote. Overall I had an excellent time, which I hope comes across despite the brevity of my report.

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4 Responses to “What we did in Sydney”

  1. Stan Says:

    Yes, your enjoyment definitely comes across. I’m glad you had a good time, and I like all the photos, many of which have a satisfying depth that invites poring over. The first one, with the railway line, is probably my favourite; #7, with the bird on the rock, may be my second. Also, “bonus tortoise” is a very pleasing phrase.

  2. Adrian Morgan Says:

    Thanks, Stan. I’m glad you like my photographs, and if you were watching my Twitter feed while I was away you would have seen several more, because with my ten inch laptop monitor I couldn’t decide which were the best until I got home. The railway photograph did come out nicely; and as you know, taking a successful photograph from a moving vehicle requires a lot more luck than taking one on foot.

    I’m sure you would have enjoyed Nutcote, as it’s an interesting insight into the personal life of a famous and historically significant author. Visitors are treated to a guided tour of the house and garden, which begins with a video documentary. I asked about her innovative use of language (in particular the fictional slang she invented for her characters) and was not surprised to learn that she was criticised for it.

  3. Helen Warman Says:

    Hi Adrian, I enjoyed your descriptions of your trip to Sydney. We were there last year in September to visit my brother, Ron and Jan, who have since moved to Orange. I remember from years ago that I really liked the Chinese Garden and eating Chinese food in China Town. I remember Ian as I have met him several times when he came to SA.

    It sounds like the 3 of you fitted quite a lot of activities into your time in Sydney. The pictures are good. Helen.

  4. Adrian Morgan Says:

    I liked the Chinese Gardens too, but I was also very aware of how incongruous the city buildings are behind it. I had a Mexican lunch that day, incidentally.


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