Easter pictures

This is a collection of photographs taken on Easter Saturday and on the morning of Easter Sunday. It includes Saturday night bonfire and Sunday morning egg-rolling on the sandhills.

But first, here’s a photo of Mum feeding lambs. (I was feeding one too as I took the picture.)

On Saturday we had a bonfire with friends. Here’s a picture of Dad and two friends around the smaller cooking fire, with the main fire as yet unlit.

When we lit the big fire, the cows came to watch.

Here it is burning its hardest.

Damper being cooked on the coals of the cooking fire.

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Moving onto Sunday now, and a tradition we picked up in Scotland is that before you can eat your easter egg, you have to break it by rolling it down a hill. “Rolling” is defined loosely. Here’s Mum, Dad and sister rolling eggs.

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Here’s an egg being “rolled” back up again.

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Sitting down afterwards.

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4 Responses to “Easter pictures”

  1. ElshaHawk Says:

    We hardly use real eggs anymore. When I was little, we always colored our own real eggs, but now we just let the kids find plastic ones filled with candy or pocket change. The Easter Bunny even got lazy and didn’t even hide the baskets this year…

  2. Flesh-eating Dragon Says:

    The eggs being rolled down the sandhill are chocolate, with plastic wrap to keep the sand out (it’s the plastic wrap you see poking up above the red one). However, one of our eggs broke prematurely this year (squashed on return from shopping), so in the photo where two objects are being rolled down, the one higher up is really a chocolate rabbit being used as a substitute.

    In Scotland, where we learned the custom, we used real (hard boiled) eggs, and did it in our own yard instead of at the beach. Supposedly, the egg represents the stone being rolled away from Jesus’s tomb.

  3. rosie Says:

    Looks like a seriously good place for a fire and picnic.

  4. Flesh-eating Dragon Says:

    It’s a seriously good place for a lot of things, being on my parents’ farm where I grew up. :-)


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